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20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN2 20
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 10:30am EST
of 1940 the and journeys of grandeur to write in the streets of cairo to make a plea for cairo. they drove the i talions pretty far west into libya to bailout mazzoleni although they were not happy about that the famous tank commander along with a bunch of panthers and effectively drove the british back into egypt. now when the summer rolls around things quiet down and it's terribly hot and they would seize the two sides to begin, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again advanced by the british into libya in hopes of driving back the forces he turned around and pushed the british back again and all the way this time sort of disastrously all the way deep into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so, when the american soldiers arrived, the allies i should say and the axis forces were dug in and testing each other in a place which was about 60 miles west of alexandria close enough to alexandria which was the british naval center in egypt close enough to cairo to be really extremely dangerous and i think frightening to all the allies on the suez canal or the middle eastern oil fie
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 4:30pm EST
visions of grandeur, he wanted to ride his streets down the roads of cairo and he decided to attack the british doing it. the british attacked back and drove the italians pretty far west into libya, at which point hitler realized that he really needed to bail out, although don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in or when ronald, along with a bunch of others and he effectively drove the british back into egypt. now, when the summer rolled around, things will quiet down and it was terribly hot. the campaigning with its glory would stop. they would advance then into libya in hopes of driving the forces back. ronald turned around and press the british back again. all the latest time, sort of disastrously, into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so when the american soldiers arrived, the british allies and the axis forces -- the idea in testing each other, which was about 60 miles west of alexandria, close enough to alexandria, which was the british naval center in egypt, close enough to cairo, to be very dangerous and i think extremely frightening to all of the allies
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 10:00pm EST
down the street of cairo. he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east, the british attacked right back, and drove the italians pretty far west in to libya, at which point hitler realized he needed to power. i don't think he was happy about it. he sent inner win, the famous take commander along with a bunch of [inaudible] and he effectively drove the british back in to egypt. the campaigning would seize and the two sides would give inspect in the fall of 1941, there was advance by the british in to libya in hopes of driving the access forces back. rommel turned around and pushed the british back again, and all the way this time, sort of disastersously deep in to egypt deeper than ever been. when the american soldiers arrived, the british the allies, i should say and the access forces were dug in testing each other in a place called the al main line. which was 60 miles west of al sand rei ya which was the british navel center in egypt. close enough to cairo and the suez canal, to be really extremely dangerous and frightening to all the allies. beyond the
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 12:00pm EST
, wanted to ride his white stallion down the streets of cairo. he had trooped in libya when was an italian colony, and he decided to make a play for cairo, attack the british going east. the british attacked right back and went, drove the italians pretty far west into libya at which point hitler realized he really needed to bail out his pal, mussolini, although i don't think he was happy about it. so he sent in irwin rommel, the famous tank commander, along with a bunch of perhapsers, and he effectively drove the british back into egypt. now, when the summer rolls around, things would kind of quiet down. it was terribly hot, and the campaigning would sort of cease, the two sides would dig in, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again an advance by the british into libya in hopes of driving the axis forces back. rommel turned around and pushed the british back again all the way this time, sort of disastrously, all the way deep into egypt, deeper than they'd ever been before. so when the american soldiers arrived, the british, the allies, i should say, and the axis forces were kind of dug
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 6:00am EST
to unicef to provide education and trauma support for children and water and sanitation services. in cairo last week i called on other countries to increase their contribution to the relief effort which the u.n. has described as critically underfund. however, what is urgently needed is a political transition to new and legitimate leadership that reflects the will of the syrian people and that can end the violence and begin to rebuild the country is regional and international support. on the 13th of november, there was a major breakthrough in doha with the establishment of syrian and opposition forces which has been welcomed by many syrians. last friday i met the president and two of the vice presidents of the national coalition on their first visit to europe. i sought assurances from them in three areas. first, i urged them to commit themselves to gone -- build their political structures. second, i encouraged them to use the next friends of syria meeting -- which we hope will be held in morocco next month -- to set out a plan for syria's future in detail. >> and third, a clear commitment t
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 9:00am EDT
. walk around shubra and cairo or the poor parts of algiers, and you will see what i'm talking about. a person who drove us to the airport, someone we've known for many years in cairo, was in tears -- [speaking in native tongue] no work. no work for him, no work for his son, no work for his cousin. egypt is trying to get back onto its feet as these other countries are after dictators that failed and failed again. and then they got hit with the revolutionary economics that most countries get hit with. there was a great deal of hope amongst the people in egypt, tunisia and libya that their economies will get back on their feet after this. well, that's really not the way revolutions work historically. usually there are difficult times, and they last for a long time. almost all of these countries need great economic reforms and deep, long-lasting economic reforms. i've been trying to listen to what president morsi and others are saying about economic reforms, and all i hear is confused ideology. and what i've seen is nothing. no reform, no change, no action, and unemployment is getting w
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 8:00pm EST
things like close guantanamo bay and end torture, gave very important speeches in osloy and cairo, and, yet, four years later, the opinion of america and things american improved here and there, but not to the degree of which a lot of people, including people in the administration expected them to in this period of time. if you look at the global attitudes index, for instance, the most recent one, and it's in negative territory, in the he's, china, india, and about the only things that the rest of the world likes about america are movie, tv, science, and technology. they are not keen on the democracy, as least as america preaches it. heading now into another four years of the obama administration where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? how do we live up to that promise? what went wrong? what's going right? what can we do about it going forward? >> simple. [laughter] well, fist of all, i don't think that favorability ratinging in the surveys are evidence of whether we are doing something wrong or right, and it's a huge mistake for anybody who practices publi
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 8:00pm EST
it for the figure -- first time. last, as an overall lesson, as much as words matter, whether it's the cairo speech delivered in 2009 or your repeated and important declarations on prevention of iran's nuclear capabilities, actions matter most. don't mistake the former for the latter, and, today, i just have to step out of my role for a moment because as a historian, today's the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. sen -- seventy years ago, there was a middle east. just imagine a president saying this. praise be unto you in the name of the god the compassionate, the merciful, oh, ye muslims, may the blessings of god be upon you. it's a great day for you because, behold, we, the american, holy warriors arrived, come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa. imagining an american president praisihe great jihad of american freedom once again. [laughter] we don't remember that because words mean so much less than actions. all right. if those are three broad lessons, what are
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 11:00pm EST
. as the overall less than whether the cairo speech he delivered in 2009 or your repeated declaration of prevention of iran nuclear capabilities to not mistake the former for the latter. today as a historian it is the anniversary of my her favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east 70 years ago today president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement to the people of the middle east imagine a president saying this. praise unto you the compassion and merciful. me the blessing of god be upon you. the great day for you because we the american and holy warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa so just imagine the president praising the american in jihad of freedom. [laughter] if those are three broad lessons witter the three most urgent find your agenda? because dealing with the rand generally, brain down a side quickly but prevent change the collapse of one or more at additional regime especially monarchies. morocco has figured out how did its surv
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 11:00pm EST
went out and gave important speeches at oslo and cairo and yet four years later, opinion of america have improved herein they are, but certainly not to the degree that i think a lot of people, including people in the administration expected them to in this period of time. if you look at the hugh global attitudes index, the most recent one opinion of the united states is in negative territory for every country they serve and the middle east. also china and in the eye. about the only thing the rest of the world likes about america are movie, tv, science and technology. they're not too keen on democracy as america preaches to. so heading now into another four years of the obama administration, where are we and why are we here? how to get somewhere else? how do we live up to that promise? what went wrong -- what's going right in what can we do about it going forward? >> simple. first of all, i don't thing that the favorability ratings -- there we go. so i don't think favorability rating in the pew surveys are evidence of whether were doing something wrong or right and i think it's a hug
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 6:00am EST
cairo and oslo, you know, to incredible speeches in 2009, to decisions that will have to be made about bahrain and iran. and if you can connect cairo to bahrain, then how do we feel about democracy, we understand there's a concept but how does it apply to a monarchy that is under siege, that's one. and then, how do we connect oslo as the president talked about just war to a decision that has to be made about the prospect of using military force to solve a difficult and consequential matter of iran's nuclear mission. if you can eventually draw a line from one to the other, one to the other, then that would be a significant public diplomacy legacy. >> i think p.j. is right, the legacy august the, you four more years ago but it's going to clergy been on the outcomes of withdrawal of iraq and downsize in afghanistan and how that goes together goes well, you get a great legacy. poorly, it will inflame the region and in packaged in a. the one thing we've not yet had a chance to touch on in this discussion, is the role of course of china. secretary made big push for internet freedom. i think
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 12:00pm EST
it is the cairo speech that you delivered in 2009 or your repeated and important declarations on prevention of iran's nuclear capabilities, actions matter most. don't mistake the former for the latter. and today i just have to step out of my role for a moment because as a historian today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement for the people of the middle east. just imagine a president saying that. praise be to you and the name of god the passionate, the merciful. may god be upon you. this is a great day for you because behold a week, the american warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa and prisoner agreed jihad of american freedom once again but we don't remember that because words matter so much less than actions. if those are three broad lessons were the three most urgent issues on your agenda here won't repeat the words of my colleag
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 8:00pm EST
undercity published by random house. and robert a cairo. "passage of power." and the late anthony. "house of stone" a memoir of home, family, and middle east published by mid land park. the weapon -- winner of the 2012 national book award for non-fiction describes a world that couldn't be any more difficult from the world that we're enjoying here tonight. yesterday it's a world that our world depends entirely upon. the subject of this book have been patronized and are manhattan sized, and eagerly egg neared in previous work. in this book, they appear in all of their complexity. the villain and sometimes villains along with the types heroes. the -- behind the bock reminds us all that good listening is an ethical act. stylistically, this book pretty much invents a new genre of non-fiction writing because the author rivals the great novelists in developing characters and plotting various narratives that intersect, and setting up surprises and creating tension. the winner of the 2012 non-fiction national book award is katherine. "behind the beautiful forever, life, death, and hope in mum boy
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 12:00pm EST
employee keeping the office open. and when something really big happens in cairo, when something really big happens in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you ship in one of the star correspondents, or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are, and what the political dynamic in that country is, that really is not happening much anymore. and parenthetically, what's happening in our business is also happening over in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 5:00pm EST
taking pictures of some big a dent in cairo? we knew he was taking that picture, and you knew that it was an objective look at was happening at that time. i don't have any feel for that at all today. i don't know who is taking the pictures or that they are even working for a network. number one, notice the number of times if you watch more than one newscast. notice the number of times that you will see precisely the same video. when it comes from overseas in large measure because the networks don't have their own reporters and camera people over there any more and they have bought it from the same single source. what is wrong after all with having a local reporter covering the event? she knows the people. let's say that local reporter is reporting from tehran and that local reporter knows that if he or she makes a nice step in what he or she reports they are going to be arrested and thrown in jail. that is probably the worst thing that is going to happen. finally, i find that there is absolutely no willingness on the part of the critics to believe that object to the team journ
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 11:00pm EDT
thought that ran on the platform of transparency to reach out but i was then cairo with obama's and talking about new beginning everybody was impressed as a reporter was extremely frustrating tried to get my a phone call returned or the email answered it is a battle ever since we formed a of group for those trying to cover the white house trying to get attention from the administration it is very tough. now the president on the campaign trail it is very hard that was the case. cannot explain it contradicted we hope to would have happened but that was not the case. >> i think that was very confusing the first thing obama did let's go to egypt the arab media thought it would have better access to him. >> how does american media bias affect the middle east media? >> if you talk about fox news or "new york times". [laughter] my aspiration is to find the ultimate objective outlet but here in the united states you're frustrated to watch the daily news. will broadcast medium abc, cbs, nbc, cnn, fox, any thing with 9/11 or terrorism always guilty before you are proven innocent and rus
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
think the last meeting that took place in cairo regarding syria i think was the first meeting after the elections, the american elections, and i think it was an interesting development this because you had a gulf states, and with europeans and with the united states, these are starting to say, all right, think of a strategy to help the addition of syria, and if the lip service is not good enough, they need help in a substantial way. arming is now on the table, de facto whether it's pronounced or not, and it's not a problem, the arabs do that. the saudis will not, the qat it ars, and nobody's talking about american troops on the ground there. this is one most important development and why is it your important? because it is really now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 9:00am EST
to this because you know, everyone in this room should read the robert cairo for falling on lyndon johnson to pursue additional already read the first three. at the fourth one, and it is available on cds. it's 26 cds long. and if you're curious how long that takes, that's a drive from washington, d.c. to tampa, florida, where they have the republican convention, to charlotte where democrats had their convention, fort bragg, back to charlotte, washington. that's 26 cds. [laughter] but i have this image of lyndon johnson spinning in his grave at the idea that there is a president of the united states that has minimal interaction with congress. and particularly someone of his own party. and when you, let's just forget republicans and let's forget tea party people. forget them. just in his own party, wander around the hill as all of you to around all the time and ask members of the democratic at how much personal interaction you have with the president. and i have, you know, i hate giving political credit for anything, but they had that piece back in may. just pointed out that the president, a
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 9:00am EST
the world come and my point is this. whether you are in baltimore brazil, kansas city or cairo, that our young men and women with desire and potential to build a bright future, to work on business and social innovations that can unleash an new wave of opportunity and economic growth. for this generation, the internet is a primary platform for innovation, where their future is being invented. my experience has convinced me that we are at a crossroads. the threats are real. but nothing i've seen has shaken my optimism. working hard and working together, i'm convinced that we can turn back the threats and ensure that all people benefit from the amazing opportunities of the internet and that we can, as newt minow taught us, harness new communications technologies to help deliver a future of prosperity and peace. thank you. [applause] >> terrific. thank you very much, chairman genachowski. and also want to thank you on behalf of my company, ibm. you sustained a really constructive dialogue with my chairman and ceo, both new and old one, over the years in the administration. thank you very muc
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)